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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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528

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

San Francisco 14, Us 14, Dr. Campbell 3, Cohen 2, William Wiley 2, Connecticut 2, Sandy 2, De Leon 1, Leland Yee 1, Malia Cohen 1, Jeff Chadsey 1, Beaver 1, Mason 1, Brisbane 1, United States 1, Ma 1, T.j. 1, Dr. Joe Marshall 1, Gareki 1, Berkeley 1,
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  SFGTV    [untitled]  

    December 23, 2012
    7:00 - 7:30pm PST  

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sudden buy into that when you took an oath for this office and you turned around and did completely the opposite? if i had a summer home in san francisco and a winter home in hell, i'd spend all my summers in my winter home. thank you. >> thank you. is there anyone else who did not speak under item number 4 that would like to speak on item 9, this is a continuation of that item. i can't -- at this point, could you -- if you could wait until after this item, please. >> this is public comment, is it? >> and you made public comment on item number 4. >> excuse me, ma'am, i would like to comment -- >> that's not the system. it's basically you get 3
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minutes to comment under general public comment and we heard your general public comment and we appreciate it and we heard other public comment. there isn't a series of comments on other people's comments. if you have something that you want -- you had three minutes under general public comment. that's the subject matter. i'm sorry to do that but that's the rules and we have to apply them to everybody equally, if we show any favoritism to all, we have to show it to all and the rule is not proper. send us something in writing and let us know, thank you. >> if i may, it's on the -- i did not raise this in the previous point. >> it doesn't matter, the three minutes are up and if i do it for you, i have to do it for everybody, so i apologize that it's an inconvenience to you but you can express anything you like to us in writing and we'll read it and take it into
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consideration. thank you. >> i object to the inability to stand in support of gene gareki and my fellow members and i regret your decision that it's not permitted. >> is there anyone else who wants to make public comment and did not comment under item 4. seeing none, general public comment is closed. we are on number 10, commissioners' matters, commissioners, do you have any matters? >> seeing none, is there any public comment? . seeing none, public comment is closed. item number 11, new business, agenda setting, seeing none, item 11 , public comment is
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closed. communications? seeing none, pub ling comment is closed. adjournment. >> moved and seconded. all those in favor. >> aye. >> the meeting is adjourned. happy holidays.
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>> greetings, san franciscans. here with a weekly thought. the last week of december and the holidays. before you celebrate with the folks in your life, take a minute and celebrate with me as i countdown the top three places to be. this tuesday, december 25th, join us live for the annual christmas party to celebrate and donate some of your time and serve dinner to thousands of needy families. volunteers are also encouraged monday night to help prepare dinner for the celebration. after your good deeds have fun at fort mason at the music and arts festival. this friday, december 29th, the pavilion plays host to the first winter festival. travis barker, t.j. shadow, including various artists from the bay area.
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like a good bargain? this saturday december 29th, wing side treasure island for the treasure island complete, monthly open air flea market with hundreds of veriedvers. collectors and makers and more will be on-site including outdoor exhibits, scavenger hunts. and that's the weekly buzz. for more information about any of these events, visit us at sf grouch tv.org. >> in january everything changes. all of san francisco's parking meters will now be enforced 7 days a week. feeding the meter 7 days a week reduces parking demand in commercial corridors and for most faster turn over of the parking spaces. the muni system has improved for sunday. learn more about 7 day meters at sfmta.com.
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>> i'm your host of "culturewire," and today, here at electric works in san francisco. nice to see you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around? >> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many
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different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco was in need of all these different services? >> it came from stepping out of graduate school in 1972. i wrote a little thing about how this is an idea, how our world should work. it should have printmaking, archiving, a gallery. it should have a retail store. in 1972, i wanted to have art sales, point-of-sale at the grocery store. >> so you go through the manifesto. with the bay area should have. you are making art incredibly accessible in so many different ways, so that is a good segue. let's take a walk around the facilities. here we are in your gallery space. can you tell me about the current show? >> the current show is jeff chadsey. he is working on mylar velum, a
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smooth, beautiful drawing surface. i do not know anyone that draws as well as he does. it is perfect, following the contours and making the shape of the body. >> your gallery represents artists from all over, not just the bay area, an artist that work in a lot of different media. how to use some of what you look for in artists you represent? >> it is dependent on people are confident with their materials. that is a really important thing. there is enough stuff in the world already. >> you also have in his current show an artist who makes sculpture out of some really interesting types of materials. let's go over and take a look at that. here we are in a smaller space. project gallery. >> artists used the parameters of this space to find
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relationships between the work that is not out in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons, something that is so familiar, like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly, it becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil.
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her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not shown much. now let's look at other aspects of electric works operation. let's go to the bookstore. >> ok. >> in all seriousness, here we are in your store. this is the first space you encounter when you come in off the street. it has evolved since you open here into the most amazingly curious selection of things.
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>> this was the project for the berkeley art museum. it was -- this is from william wiley's retrospective, when he got up onstage to sing a song, 270 people put on the cat. >> it is not just a bookstore. it is a store. can you talk us through some of your favorites? >> these are made in china, but they are made out of cattails. >> these pieces of here, you have a whale head and various animals and their health over there, and they are jewelry. >> we do fund raisers for nonprofits, so we are doing a project for the magic theater, so there are some pretty funny cartoons. they are probably not for prime time. >> you sort of have a kind of holistic relationship where you might do merchandise in the store that promotes their work
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and practice, and also, prince for them. maybe we should go back and look at the print operation now. >> let's go. >> before we go into the print shop, i noticed some incredible items you have talked back here. what are we standing in front of? >> this is william wiley, only one earth. this is a print edition. there are only eight total, and what we wanted to do was expand the idea of printmaking. this is really an art object. there we go. >> besides the punball machine, what do you produce in limited edition? >> there is the slot machine. if you win the super jackpot, you have saved the world. >> what about work?
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>> the right design, it was three volumes with lithographs in each volume. the cab of count dracula with 20 lithographs inside and lined with beaver fur. really special. >> let's move on to the print shop. >> ok. the core of what we do is making things. this is an example. this is a print project that will be a fund-raiser for the contemporary music players. we decided to put it in the portfolio so you could either frame at or have it on your bookshelf. >> so nonprofits can come to you, not just visual are nonprofits, but just nonprofits can come to you, and you will produce prints for them to sell, and the profits, they can keep. >> the return on investment is usually four times to 10 times
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the amount of investment. this is for the bio reserve in mexico, and this is one of the artists we represent. >> you also make prints for the artists that you represent. over here are some large prints by a phenomenal artist. >> he writes these beautiful things. anyone who has told you paradise is a book of rules is -- has only appeared through the windows. this is from all over coffee. we are contract printers for all kinds of organizations all across the country. >> thank you very much for showing us around today. i really appreciate you taking the time to let me get better acquainted with the operation and also to share with our "culturewire" team.
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>> good morning, everyone. thank you for being here. you know, as we look through this year, there's obviously some incredible events that have occurred. and for me as mayor of san francisco, i know that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city.
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to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only
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responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more.
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and this is where i want to make sure i recognize all of the people that are in that effort of doing something about it, including the officials in san francisco. and some have been at this longer than others to try to do something about it, have reached limitations. yet again, i think this tragedy at sandy hook reminds us that we've got to keep trying and we've got to keep doing more about it. and, so, i want to first of all recognize that senator feinstein, in my conversations with her, and the tragedies she's experienced as mayor of san francisco as well as her attempts to ban assault weapons and had done so in the past, and that her federal assault legislation, while ended, she will reintroduce that in january and we will be big supporters of that. and she will continue dialoguing on a national level, and we will support her efforts
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and the efforts of all of our federal officials to do more, along with the president of the united states and congress to act. and, in fact, i joined over 750 other mayors across this country, using social media and the technology that's available to us today to signal a demand to our congress that we really need a plan and a plan and an action to follow that, to ban these assault weapons and to make sure that we do everything we can to create a higher level of safety throughout the country. assault weapons and the types of things that we've seen in the hands of people who are doing evil or can do evil really have no place, in the home or in the schools or in our streets. and, so, with that we ask ourselves what we can do locally. i also want to recognize the three state senators, senator de leon, state senator leland
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yee and state senator ted gains, all three of which are sponsoring some five different pieces of state legislation aimed at banning assault weapons and munitions, getting higher levels of background checks and registries, and also i think senator gains is attempting to also make sure that those that have backgrounds of mental health challenges are lifetime bans of possessing these weapons. again, in an attempt to do what we can. in san francisco, we tried to ban assault weapons some years ago. we were unsuccessful in the courts in being able to do so. we are going to renew these efforts in light of the sandy hook sentiment and i know there's just a higher level of sentiment that causes us to focus even more on what we can do locally. in fact, this higher level of sentiment, as you'll hear from the police chief, has even
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caused one of the highest rates of gun return. certainly we paid some money for that, but he's going to tell you there are some individuals out there, in light of sandy hook, that returned their guns and without even asking for remuneration of those guns. and he'll explain that level of detail. but it was the highest level of gun return this past weekend that we were honored to share with our community partners in making sure that we get these guns off the streets. two pieces of legislation that we are introducing to the board of supervisors with the support of our police chief, our health department, and certainly being led by supervisor cohen whose district has experienced an inordinate amount of violence throughout this year. we talk about it all the time. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by
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law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to
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reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. these are at least two things that we are introducing today. there are potentially more to come, but we wanted to begin by taking action on this. and i stand here in front of you with a full display of some of the armory that was collected, turned in by people with the incentive of providing them with some remuneration of these weapons that were in their homes or other types of possession of this. and, of course, some of the ammunition that we will let you see that is not just body piercing, but designed to even be even more destructive. that's the reason why i have
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dr. campbell here. there have been many occasions, doctor, that i've been very thankful for you and your expert way of treating our patients whether firefighters or police officers are injured. but he has seen more than he should ever see of young -- youth who are victims of these bullets and the guns that we are talking about today. and he wants to explain the human side of this with our public health department officials. but i'd like to have further testimony by supervisor cohen of her experience and her leadership in helping me establish this. i will want to again put it in context that our city wants to intervene at an earlier stage. we want to do predictive policing. we want to support efforts throughout our community to organize them better so that we can prevent violence. this was at the heart of our
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work, introducing more support for our domestic violence advocates as well that we did just a few weeks ago. that with the heightened awareness of guns and the kinds of things that happen nationally, this is consistent with what we're willing to do. so, let me introduce at this time a good partner and the one that will be introducing this at the board, supervisor malia cohen. >> thank you. thank you, mr. mayor, for your leadership. and chief, thank you for your continuing efforts to be a tremendous advocate and partner. and our collective effort to address gun violence in our city. as the mayor mentioned, the tragic event that occurred at sandy hook elementary school last week was truly horrifying. and painful for all of us to sit back and witness. but i'm here today not to speak of last week's events in connecticut, but i'm here today because of the phone calls that i regularly get from many of the police officers that are here in this room today in the
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middle of the night. department officers informing me and alerting me of the violent shootings that are happening right here in our own neighborhood. i'm here today because i have personally visited too many families as they grieve the loss of loved ones, largely due to gun violence. i'm here today because of the time that i've spent at general hospital consoling innocent victims of gun violence, some as young as five years old. i'm here because we have to do more and use every legislative and executive power that are available to us to continue to address the causes as well as the impacts of senseless gun violence occurring in our neighborhoods. now, what we know is that many of the shootings that are occurring are increasingly involving young adults under the age of 25 years old. they are often related to disputes over turf and status and they're fueled by the fact that it's easy to obtain -- too easy to obtain and possess
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military style assault weapons and hollow point ammunition. as you will hear today from dr. campbell, thea hollow type ammunition especially [speaker not understood] to victims because the ammunition is designed to expand and shred an individual's internal organs upon impact, making it nearly impossible for a medical professional to repair and save lives. last week i had the pleasure of joining the police department as well as our community partner the omega boys club headed by dr. joe marshall and one of the most successful gun buy back programs. we collected approximately 2 96 guns off the street, 300 we were able to get guns off of out of hands of folks. not just in the southeast neighborhood, but all across san francisco. and i think we have a collective understanding that there is a growing awareness on the part of san franciscans about the need to do more to
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address gun violence and to believe -- and i believe that there is a desire for us as elected officials to take greater steps in implementing institutional solutions to these issues. * these weapons and this ammunition over here to my right don't belong in the hands of san francisco and online suppliers, online suppliers have an obligation to disclose to law enforcement officers information about residents buying large amounts of this lethal ammunition. i just want to say thank you for being here. i look forward to introducing this legislation. as soon as we hit the ground running in january. i appreciate your support, mr. mayor, and i look forward to continuing to working together. thank you. * >> thank you, supervisor. chief has been a great partner in not only law enforcement, with ideas of what else we could do. * chief sur i'm going to ask the chief to come up and talk about